My Favorite Hockey Players To Wear Each Number 0-99

Note: I just noticed today that I started this post on July 19 *last year* and thought I’d go ahead and finish it. I left the intro for irony’s sake. My attitude changed slightly too, since I started it, and I did end up skipping some numbers. Oh well

 

Hey! It only took me 9 months to write another post, wow, I’m getting good at this. Today’s post was inspired by an article of interest over at Fansided’s Puck Prose page where they list the best player to wear each number in NHL history. I’ve only been lucky enough to watch hockey for about 3 decades, so many of the earlier, notable players were before my time, but I figured I could probably find a favorite to wear each, if not most, numbers on the list, whether considered among the best or not. Here we go (and yes, this took forEVER)

Except for 0 (zero) because I’ve never heard of the only guy to ever wear it so…

1: Mike Liut, one of the first Blues I can remember, goalie from the 1980’s

2: Al MacInnis, easy choice, one of the best ever, still with the organization

3: Al Arbour, obviously never saw him play, but he’s the link between Blues & Islanders

4: Marc Bergevin. the original Bergie. Terrible GM now, but hilarious on the ice

5: Barrett Jackman, hope he continues working with young Blues players

6: Phil Housley, got his autograph once in the parking lot of the old barn

7: “Big Walt” Keith Tkachuk, one of my favorite players ever

8: Mark Recchi, one of the few non-Blues on my list

9: Gordie Howe, greatest of all-time

10: Pavel Bure, one of the greatest Russians I’ve ever seen play

11: Brian Sutter, probably my favorite Blues coach too

12: Adam Oates, had he stayed with Hullie, both would’ve lifted the Cup with the Blues

13: Pavel Datsyuk, despite playing for arch-rival Detroit, hard not to love his game

14: Geoff Courtnall, wish he’d been a Blue earlier in his career

15: Stanley Cup Champion Robby Fabbri

16: “The Golden Brett” Brett Hull, obviously

17: Basil McRae, a face only a mother could love

18: “The Twister” Tony Twist, toughest guy I’ve ever seen on the ice

19: Brendan Shanahan, because I’ve already got 1 Red Wing on this list 😉

20: Stanley Cup Champion Alexander Steen #GOBLUES

21: Peter Forsberg, one of my generation’s greatest players

22: Mike Bossy, many of you may not know I’m an Islanders fan

23: Craig MacTavish, a classic

24: Bernie Federko, Blues Hall of Famer

25: Dave Andreychuk, a true NHL workhorse

26: Peter Stastny, I liked him far more than I liked Paul

27: Stanley Cup Champion Alex Pietrangelo

28: Bob Bassen, Bobby B!

29: Stanley Cup Champion Vince Dunn (there may be a pattern here)

30: Martin Brodeur, wish he’d stayed with the Blues management

31: Curtis Joseph (CuJo!)

32: Mike Eastwood (most of the NHL “greats” who wore this # were assholes)

33: Patrick Roy, I had the luck to grow up watching the 2nd generation of greatest goalies

34: Murray Baron, stalwart of the Blues lean years

35: Brent Johnson, my 1st Blues jersey

36: J.J. Daigneault, another smooth, brief, Blues blue-liner, plus, just a cool name

37: Eric Desjardins, French-Canadian, defenseman, from my other favorite Eastern team

38: Pavol Demitra, RIP 😦

39: Doug Weight, another vet with a brief Blues stint, almost said Dominik Hasek

40: Fred Brathwaite, breifly a Blues goalie, good guy

41: Stanley Cup Champion Robert Bortuzzo

42: Former Blues Captain David Backes

43: Patrice Brisbois, another guy who I came to know & love thanks to NHL ’93 (game)

44: Chris Pronger, probably my favorite player of all-time

45: at this point I stop picking guys just because they played for the Blues, I got nothing

46: Roman Polak, the door’s been opened, and now I love to see the Blues beat him

47: Rich “the pylon” Pilon, maybe the slowest player ever to play in the NHL?

48: Scott Young, part of the last Blues team that shoulda won the Cup (before they did)

49:Stanley Cup Champion Ivan Barbashev

50: I’ll say Stanley Cup Champion Jordan Binnington, because the Cup

51-52: did you know no Blues player has ever worn these numbers?

53-54: these were worn but by nobodies 

55: Stanley Cup Champion Colton Parayko

56: Sergei Zubov, a legend

57: Stanley Cup Champion David Perron (3rd time WAS a charm)

58: Dan Hinote, tough not to like the guy once he was on “your”team

59: nope

60: another one no Blues player has worn (Vladi Sobotka wore it in BUF after The Trade)

61: Corey Stillman, another guy who should’ve helped the Blues win more

62: Ollie Jokinen, have you seen his face? lol

63: zilch

64: Stanley Cup Champion Sammy Blais

65: Erik Karlsson, not really a fan, but I respect his status as one of the best

66: Mario Lemieux, no contest

67: nada

68: Jaromir Jagr, another no brainer

69: heh, hehe

70: Stanley Cup Champion Oskar Sundqvist

71: Evgeni Malkin, beast

72: Matheiu Schneider, one-time Islander, gotta be one of the best US born players

73: Kenny Agostino, the kind of guy you figure will return to hurt the Blues someday

74: T.J. Oshie, still a fan, had to leave to win It

75: Ryan Reaves, Reavo will always be a fan-favorite in St. Louis

76: P.K. Subban, hated him playing v. the Blues, but he’ll kill it in NJ

77: Pierre Turgeon (I wasn’t a huge Ray Bourque fan)

78: Beau Bennett? Nice guy, had a cup of coffee with the Blues

79: Alexei Yashin, one of the Russian standouts from the 1990’s

80: Geoff Sanderson, mostly just because I like to say Gee-Off

81: Miroslav Satan, what a name!

82: Stanley Cup Champion Zach Sanford, barely counts though, he switched to #12

83-84: no Blues, nobody else I really even know

85: Petr Klima, sick mitts

86: Nikita Soshnikov, really thought he’d contribute for the Blues

87: Sidney Crosby, hard not to like the Kid

88: Eric Lindros, maybe my 2nd favorite player ever

89: Alexander Mogilny, another ’90’s Russian sniper

90: Stanley Cup Champion, Conn Smythe & Selke Trophy winner Ryan O’Reilly

91: Stanley Cup Champion Vladimir Tarasenko

92: yeah, no

93: Petr Nedved, another classic, one-time Blues player

94-96: zero interest in anyone who wore these numbers

97: I’m including Jeremy Roenick here, one of my LEAST favorite players ever

98: Brian Lawton was the only player to ever wear this one, never heard of him

99: and of course, Wayne “The Great One” Gretzky, who did play part of one season with the Blues, and who ultimately committed the turnover that led to their playoff ouster. The last game he’d play for them. Thanks for nothing, Gretz! 😉

 

 

Reblog: Office Essentials St. Louis Technology Spotlight: Kaldi’s Coffee

I do some writing for my company’s (Office Essentials) blog on occasion and this is my most recent piece. You can find the original HERE and feel free to browse, share or comment on past articles, by me or any of the other excellent folk there. 

As part of my ongoing look at how St. Louis companies use technology, I recently had the opportunity to talk with Frank McGinty, Director of Sales and Marketing for Kaldi’s Coffee in St. Louis, Missouri. Kaldi’s is just one well-known, local partner for Office Essentials and I thought it would be interesting to know a bit about how they utilize technology in their business to bring about the product that is known so well.

Kaldi’s is known for their hand-roasted coffees, but make no mistake, they’re a modern company who understands how to integrate their time-tested, manual procedures with the benefits of today’s technological advances.

I asked Frank to describe the different ways Kaldi’s brings tech into their world of hand-crafted products.

“The first one that comes to mind is with roasting specifically. Everything is still- I call it hand-roasted because the guys are still altering dials that control the open flame, right? But they have a piece of technology that kind of tracks, due to two temperature probes and timers, it’ll essentially track the trajectory of the roast.”

You can picture the massive, old bean roasters, with their rotating blades and huge hoppers, adapted and attached by a few wires to these probes which are then attached to a computer screen or a laptop computer that is tracking the rise and fall of the temperature of the beans in this particular roast over time.

“They’ll pre-warm the barrel, add coffee, then the temperature drops, plateaus and then recovers, then starts increasing as the roast progresses, being able to throw that data on a chart they’re able to save for every roast. Then afterward, as they go back and taste the coffee they can say, “Hey, the recipe you did last Tuesday for this house blend is the best I’ve ever tasted, let’s save that as a new trajectory.” We use that equipment quite a bit.”

Kaldi’s uses these recipes as roadmaps to replicate certain roasts, but it’s nothing that you can simply plug into the computer then set on the roaster and walk away.

“We will kind of copy and paste these trajectories making sure we’re all on the same page with how heat and time are applied to the same product across our brands- We’ve got two other brands. One is Honolulu Coffee Company in Hawaii and the other one is called Frothy Monkey Roasting Company- but the roasters are always there manually manipulating the temperature on the beans, following along with the tracking data we’ve been able to log.”

As you might imagine, they didn’t always have these probes and monitors attached to computers that can log everything and store it for quick retrieval. Technology plays a much larger role in Kaldi’s products today than ever before.

“Yeah, literally only maybe five, six years ago, the guys had a clipboard and pencil and they had waypoints when they would check the time and make notes. As I mentioned, the temperature dips then recovers, and they’d have to log it, things like, “after 1:26 recovery happened- four minutes until the first crack,” throughout the entire roast. The first crack is like the audible sound of popcorn, it’s actually the cell structure of the coffee bean rupturing. They would manually write this down for every single roast we did, and we would just have charts and charts and charts”

So, from the days of their roasters carrying a stopwatch, a pad of paper and a pencil, to today when computers log temperature changes and times for their roasts, Kaldi’s compiles their data and stores it in the Cloud making it easier than ever to share data with their entire company and their partners. This includes all the information they use to run their business.

“We have a guy on our team who built a data analytics program through Power BI (a Microsoft application) and he’s essentially able to pull all of our inventory, sales, and customer information. It’s kind of a combination between a CRM and a data analytics tool. That’s helped us a lot from a customer support, customer service standpoint: What does their product mix look like? How often do they order? And everything in between. And again, before, it was just a bunch of Excel spreadsheets with information.”

The last aspect of technology that Kaldi’s utilizes, and very well I might add, is social media. It’s almost a necessity in today’s business world, to stay in front of customers and investors and I asked Frank if Kaldi’s had someone dedicated to that mission.

“Yeah, for sure. She oversees all of that and all of our community events, charities, donations, event activations, that kind of stuff. She’s managing and she and I work together quite a bit. We’re always trying to figure out through like, Instagram Insights, for example, and all the data we get from that is like, what’s working? What’s not to like? Like lately we’ve been doing giveaways. So, you know, Mother’s Day, give away a free coffee class, or a Cardinals ticket giveaway, and it’s been interesting to see the engagement and how the use of hashtags and all other things that are somewhat algorithm driven, affect what we do. Sometimes it’s just luck of the draw if it works or not.”

I appreciate the fact Kaldi’s relies on someone in-house to accomplish this. Frank mentioned it’s easier now to find someone you can hire from outside, but they prefer to handle it themselves.

“You can pay people to come in, a consultant, to tell us what might work or what all the data means, but you know, we’re trying to figure it out internally, it’s kind of almost beta testing, like, hey, if we do this, then this happens. Then if we do it next week, and it didn’t have the same effect- it’s a learning curve all the time.”

I’d say they’re learning a lot and putting their knowledge to good use. Their list of accolades is available on their website https://kaldiscoffee.com and while there you can also see other ways they’ve integrated technology into their business. You can also sign up for coffee classes, get tips for home brewing and a lot more on their site, including what’s next to come from this innovatively traditional St. Louis roaster.

Office Essentials St. Louis Technology Spotlight: Boosa Tech

This is a post I originally wrote for my company’s blog. The original can be found HERE and through the many links below the article

St. Louis Technology Spotlight: Boosa Tech

These days nearly everyone we live with, work with, or randomly encounter throughout our day has a mobile phone. We use them to do business, to maintain our calendars, for email, to take pictures and videos, to keep up with our social media and even occasionally to make calls! As such integrated parts of our lives, we rely on our phones to always be working- that is, we count on their batteries to never let us down. We’ve all experienced the dreaded “Low Battery!” alert at inopportune times. What can you do to prevent it happening and ruining your day?

Chris Reimer, friend to OE, author, Director of Creative Services at Maryville University, and now entrepreneur, took matters into his own hands and started his own company, BOOSA TECH. BOOSA is a portable power device designed exclusively to keep your mobile phone charged and ready for whatever your day brings.

We had the chance to speak to Chris about BOOSA TECH, and I asked Chris to speak a little on why we have such a need for something like BOOSA in our lives:

Chris Reimer: “As a marketer, I’m just always burning both of my phones (work & personal) down to zero pretty much every day. When you think about what our phones provide us, even if you’re not a marketer, everything from finding our way with maps to the ability to board an airplane, to mobile payments, voice recording, not to mention phone calls, social media, email- we can make art on them- it’s just so amazing the things we can do with our phones. They provide a connection to the things we love, our families, photography, your work, and it’s just a necessity to be able to stay online.”

“So, to be able to do my work and not have to worry whether it’s new and the battery is strong and you’re still burning the battery down because you use it all day OR you’ve already got your 300 cycles in on your battery and it’s just not what it used to be. Low battery anxiety is a real thing for people. You can pay $1000 for your phone so why not spend an extra $33 with BOOSA and really never, ever have to worry about a dead phone again.”

Chris had a wonderful, real-life example of putting the BOOSA to use:

Chris Reimer: “Tonight, I’m doing a Facebook Live here at work for a veterans event we have on campus where we’re going to have representatives from several large companies who are veterans come in and speak about tips on finding jobs when they come back to the States and want to re-enter the workforce. We can put it on Facebook Live and instantly share it with veterans all over the country, but I’m going to be doing a live video for two hours, and that could burn my phone down. So, my phone’s going to be on a tripod and BOOSA will be taped to that tripod and I’ll be live the whole two hours and nothing’s going to happen to my phone and I’ll finish at 100% battery!”

Knowing there were many portable charging devices already in the marketplace, Chris really focused on finding something that had all the features important to him to set it apart from the competition. One thing I really liked about it is BOOSA is not big and bulky (it’s about the same size as your phone) so it’s easy to carry alongside your device and BOOSA starts itself when you plug in, which can be a lifesaver:

Chris Reimer: “So for instance, when you plug in the thing [your phone] turns itself on, then people forget to turn on their power banks and they go back later and nothing happened and their phones are actually down. That is incredibly frustrating. It’s literally a design flaw. Some turn themselves on and some don’t. Some have USB-C and some don’t, some are relatively good looking and others completely ugly. I’m not an inventor, I just wanted to create one that would try to include the best of everything and the worst of nothing. The USB-C port is really important. It doubles as an output, but it’s also an input, you can use it to charge the BOOSA itself.”

Finally, we joked a bit about the fact so many portable charging devices have, among varying numbers of USB ports (and sometimes USB-C ports) a flashlight! Maybe your lights go off when your phone battery runs out? I don’t know, but it’s very common and Chris actually had a very practical reason why BOOSA does NOT have one:

Chris Reimer:“What happens in a lot of people’s bags, you throw your power bank in and the flashlight accidentally turns on and burns the power down, which is bad, not to mention, they can never put one on a portable charger that’s remotely as bright as the one on your phone. We have older ones at home, goodness knows who made them, and they might get used as flashlights but not as power packs. It’s not bad, it’s just a matter of “what is the point?” For me, typically, I’ll ask the question, what’s the point of this? Why is this here? So when we’re thinking of design or use scenarios there has to be a reason for it to be there. Anytime someone is going to be using a flashlight either around the house, or you know, like the 21st-century version of putting your lighter up at a concert or whenever, you’re going to use your phone. So, we’re not going to have a flashlight on BOOSA.”

There you have it, no useless feature on BOOSA, and you can see it in all its glory, along with a ton of wonderful video FAQ answers on the BOOSA TECH website: https://boosatech.com/

Author
  • Sean Jeffries
    Sean Jeffries, Business Development Manager;  Sean has over 14 years of experience selling hardware and technology solutions for business and has been building his own PCs for at least that long. He enjoys being among the first to adopt and experiment with new technology, PC gaming, and teaching his kids how to integrate and enjoy tech at home as well.
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Writing Prompt: 15-Sentence Portrait Poem

adult anger angry angry face

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Let me start by saying it seems impossible to me that I’ve not posted anything here (ie. I’ve not written anything more than a Tweet) in A YEAR. What? Good grief. Anyway, on to the substance!

I found this from an archived post by the wonderful Jeri Walker and thought it might be fun (and potentially revealing!) to give it a go. It wasn’t implied that it be a self-portrait, but that’s where my head went. While this is something very different than what’s usually here, I hope someone enjoys reading it. I liked writing it.

 

Angry.

I think sometimes I will always be angry.

I don’t look good in red so why does my face so often show it?

Am I an old steam powered boiler, destined to burst as the pressure increases?

Knowing is half the battle, but so where is the outline for how to handle the other half?

It doesn’t exist, the way isn’t paved.

Most days I just want my shirt to fit better.

I hope my children remember me not as just angry, but passionate and deeply caring.

Bears aren’t always mean, right Yogi?

Grumpy grizzlies gradually grow into grey grumbling grandpas.

I want, more than anything, to smile by default.

Red should be associated with baseball on the TV and the smell of brats on the grill.

With my wonderful family all so close I really should be happy as a clam.

I want that. Angry isn’t who I am.

 

 

 

Procrastination, Blues Hockey, etc.

If you don’t care about hockey you may want to stop reading now. I’m a fanatic and may get into details you couldn’t care less about. Come back another day for more random writing.

 

BLUES17BKGD
“It’s finally time to officially start another season of Blues hockey! They’re on national TV tonight to open the 2017-18 NHL season with a tough draw against the reigning Stanley Cup Champion Pittsburgh Penguins and while I’m slightly disappointed we won’t get our local TV broadcast for the first game, mostly I’m just glad hockey’s back.”

I wrote those words back on October 4th, two weeks ago today. I figured I’d put together a quick post outlining my feelings on where the Blues were as they came out of camp and were ready to hit the ice for the new regular season. Every year I think of a lot of stuff to say about the Blues, music, food, life in general really, and make big plans in my head about how much I’m going to write only to find a million other things to do instead. That leads us, comically, to today, when I finally publish this post.

The Blues started off like gang-busters winning their first four games, only to stumble in Florida, at the end of a long road-trip. They’re (finally) back in action tonight, at home, against their biggest rival, the Chicago Blackhawks, after having three days off since they last played. I usually bitch about breaks like that- more than 2 days is just ridiculous- but the banged-up Blues desperately needed the time off. It’s sad, in a way, they needed is so early in the season but that’s just reality. We’ll find out later this morning if injured forward, Alexander Steen, will make his season debut tonight.

My expectations for the Blues are relatively low this season. I’m predicting a finish in the middle-bottom of the Conference standings and a fight for one of the last playoff spots. Their hot start hasn’t changed my mind, though, as we started to see some familiar problems rear their ugly heads: too many men penalties/lack of scoring from the forwards/failure to score on the power play/losing late leads. We’ve seen these issues trip them up over and over again for 2-3 seasons now. Things were supposed to be different, better, under new leadership.

It’s WAY too early to make any sweeping generalizations about the team and where they’ll finish this season, but the trends are still unsettling. One area that will be a concern throughout the campaign is goaltending; Can Jake Allen be “the guy” for St. Louis and carry the load? Is he going to rise to another level? He looked rusty in pre-season but by Game 2 (v. Dallas) he was quite sharp and has looked good. Like the team in general, is he too inconsistent? Can backup Carter Hutton push him enough to be outstanding? Hutton looked great in his start, better than I expected.

The Blues played only one Western opponent over their first two weeks so tonight’s match-up with Chicago looms large despite the early date BUT the Shithawks  Blackhawks are a point ahead and we wont see them again until March, so a win tonight would be a nice statement, especially with so many ‘Hawks fans in “our” building. Bandwagon fans tend to travel well.

Here’s hoping the Blues don’t procrastinate like I do and put off fixing their struggling power play until they’ve fallen back to reality and down the division standings. Some things (early streaks, I’m looking at you, Vegas) just don’t last and it’s a long season. I pledge to myself to write more, put things off less often, and not get too worked up about Blues losses until at least December. Yeah, good luck with that.

 

100 Word Challenge: Lost

LOST

All semblance of my humanity is gone, lost to the dark, icy waters of the lagoon. From a towering height I glare down upon the feeble defenses of the city as I cut a swath of destruction through their ranks. Wickedly taloned feet the size of tanks smash their barricades and emergency response vehicles. I care little for lives lost as a result.

Bullhorn enhanced shouts to “Halt!” are lost in the din created as I slam elephantine fists into buildings lining the streets. A hail of debris rains down as they retreat, realizing their resistance futile, the battle lost.

 

Using “lost” for inspiration, write 100 Words – 100 exactly – no more, no less. You can either use the word – or any form of the word – as one of your 100, or it can be implied. Include a link in your post back to Thin Spiral Notebook, and add your story to the Mister Linky list there. If you don’t have a blog, you can leave your submission in the comment section, or as a Facebook status post. Remember to keep spreading the love with supportive comments for your fellow Wordsters.

12 Things I See Happy People Do (that unhappy people do not)

Just now seeing this (thanks FB friend, Mindy M!) and it’s an excellent read. I don’t think any of it is ground-breaking or shocking, but we all need reminders from time to time.

Rev. Shane L. Bishop

I have been thinking a lot about happiness of late, partially because so many people seem unhappy.  I think that was my first epiphany upon entering the world of Social Media; people are unhappy and there are a lot of them.  Now don’t get me wrong, we all know some people who wouldn’t be happy, were they not unhappy but I am not talking about them.  We will just let them be.  I am also not thinking theologically here (i.e. juxtaposing happiness and joy), today I am going to err on the practical and pragmatic side of things.  With that being said, let’s get going.

I think most people want to be happy; they are just not quite sure how to get there from their present location.  Many people honestly believe that happiness is a lucky bounce; a sunny disposition or favorable circumstances but I disagree.  Happiness is a choice…

View original post 601 more words

100 Word Challenge – Books

The NYT Best Seller when I was born, in January 1973, was “Jonathan Livingston Seagull,” by Richard Bach, published three years earlier. I’ve never read it or been interested in reading it, but I’m prompted to now by a post from a friend and fellow blogger.

Mastushima-Seagull

According to Goodreads the “best” book to be released in the year of my birth is the wonderful, “The Princess Bride,” by William Goldman. Other notable titles published in 1973 include Vonnegut’s “Breakfast of Champions,” “A Wind in the Door,” the second book of Madeline L’Engel’s fantastical Time Quintet series, and “Gravity’s Rainbow,” by Thomas Pynchon.

This post was prompted by the 100 Word Challenge from Thin Spiral Notebook:

“Using “books” for inspiration, write 100 Words – 100 exactly – no more, no less. You can either use the word – or any form of the word – as one of your 100, or it can be implied.” Click the link and follow Tara’s instructions to include your own post.

T.G.I.F.

Well dangit, I couldn’t even make it a week writing every day, oh well. Yesterday was just too busy. I suppose if I was worried about it I could stockpile a bunch of posts and have them scheduled to drop each day. I’m not though and that would somehow detract from the purpose of the writing I think. Whatever.

Happy Friday and Happy Birthday to me! I say that not in blatant self-promotion, reaching and grasping for public attention, but only to note that this is the day I was born 44 years ago and it makes me reflective. Do I feel 44? What’s that supposed to feel like? Is this where I thought I’d be when I made it this far? Did I ever really think about it? Do I remember what I thought about it? mirror

I’m not having any existential crisis, just thinking about these (and other) questions. I should probably reflect more often but today seemed like a good day for it. I’m so thankful for my wonderful family that I’ll get to share this and all my days with. I love you guys SO much! I don’t get to *see* a lot of my friends very often but I feel like I have a good amount of them, which is nice.

What is about self-reflection that keeps us from doing it more often? Probably only speaking for myself but maybe there’s folks out there sharing my insecurities and thoughts on the subject. Perhaps it’s fear of seeing what we’d rather not see or admit? I honestly don’t think that’s why *I* don’t do it, I really don’t have a lot of demons and I’m pretty happy with my life as is. Maybe we are too busy, to caught up in the hustle and bustle of day-to-day life (that sounds like me!) to sit back and think of the past. That then begs the question, would be benefit from it? Would it hinder our progress? Make us sad, angry, discouraged?

I think living in the now and planning for the future is what works best for me. Hopefully mistakes I’ve made stick in memory easily enough that I don’t have to dwell on them for them to have taught me lessons on how to avoid repeating them. I feel like I’m barely halfway through my life and that actually makes me smile. I’m not famous or rich but I’ve done a fair amount of stuff in my life 🙂 Gained knowledge, shared it, made friends, loved, found the love of my life (hi babe!) and will raise our kids with her. Still an awful lot of stuff I *haven’t* done but I truly feel I’ll be doing most or all of it eventually and with my best friend, which is a nice bonus. It feels good to think about it.

Make it a great weekend. Happy Epiphany 😛

100 WORD CHALLENGE: COLD

I cannot feel my fingers or toes. Stumbling through the blowing, blinding blizzard, woefully ill-dressed for such weather, wishing I’d heeded the warnings as I ventured out alone into the woods. Limbs and trunks creaking as the temperature drops, trees shiver and snap as I brush hastily past. Ice clings to my beard and lashes as frosted, labored breath painfully plumes from my mouth, lips already dry and chapped..

Faltering, my hips and ankles seizing, I slump to my knees and fall woodenly to the ground in a puff of powdery snow. I wonder, how long until my bones freeze?

 

This week’s word is:

Cold

What to do:

Using “Cold” for inspiration, write 100 Words – 100 exactly – no more, no less. You can either use the word – or any form of the word – as one of your 100, or it can be implied. Link back to Thin Spiral Notebook to share. If you don’t have a blog, you can leave your submission in the comment section, or as a Facebook status post. Remember to keep spreading the love with supportive comments for your fellow Wordsters.